Sunday, February 18, 2018

Book: Art of the Northern Renaissance: Courts, Commerce and Devotion

In this lucid account, Stephanie Porras charts the fascinating story of art in northern Europe during the Renaissance period (c.1400–1570). She explains how artists and patrons from the regions north of the Alps – the Low Countries, France, England, Germany – responded to an era of rapid political, social, economic and religious change, while redefining the status of art. Porras discusses not only paintings by artists from Jan van Eyck to Pieter Bruegel the Elder, but also sculpture, architecture, prints, metalwork, embroidery, tapestry and armour.

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Conrad von Soest  (1370–) Blue pencil.svg wikidata:Q704984
Title
Deutsch: Passionsaltar (Wildungen-Altar)
 wikidata:Q11801539
Date
Medium tempera on wood
Dimensions 188 × 152 cm (74 × 59.8 in)


Each chapter presents works from a roughly 20-year period and also focuses on a broad thematic issue, such as the flourishing of the print industry or the mobility of Northern artists and art works. The author traces the influence of aristocratic courts as centres of artistic production and the rise of an urban merchant class, leading to the creation of new consumers and new art products. This book offers a richly illustrated narrative that allows readers to understand the progression, variety and key conceptual developments of Northern Renaissance art.

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The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck
 
  • Laurence King Publishing Ltd. 
  • Hardback
  • 135 illustrations
  • 240 pages
  • 9½ x 6½ in
  • ISBN 9781786271655
  • Published February 2018

About the Author

Stephanie Porras is Assistant Professor of Art History at Tulane University. She has published widely on the art of the Northern Renaissance and is the author of the book Pieter Bruegel's Historical Imagination.
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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Basel Short Stories

Kunstmuseum Basel
10.02.2018–21.05.2018

https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/de/sammlung/highlights

The exhibition Basel Short Stories turns the spotlight on the Kunstmuseum Basel's rich and in some respects world-famous collection, presenting less well-known treasures from the holdings in new contexts. The kaleidoscopic display unites illustrious and obscure, private and world-historical—and sometimes grotesque—events in the history of Basel that are brought into focus by art from the Kunstmuseum’s collections.

Basel Short Stories reminds the visitors of the extraordinary potential of the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel, the municipal art collection of Basel, by staging a multifaceted dialogue between forgotten or rarely seen works and icons of the collection. It reflects all divisions of the collection, from the Old Masters to the present day, and sheds new light on the humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam,

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Hans Holbein the Younger’s masterwork The Dead Christ in the Tomb, the illustrator and naturalist Maria Sibylla Merian, the historian and art historian Jacob Burckhardt, the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, the 1912 Basel Peace Congress, the figure skaters Frick and Frack, the inventor of LSD Albert Hofmann, and the women’s rights activist Iris von Roten. Each room tells a different story while also contributing to the concert of voices that make up the exhibition.

Visual short stories unfold in nine galleries, initiated by works of art, objects, and documents from the holdings of the Kunstmuseum, the Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, and other private and public collections in Basel. Several rooms have been conceived and designed in close collaboration with Silvia Bächli, Pipilotti Rist, and Not Vital, three artists whose oeuvres are represented in the

Basel Short Stories

An accompanying catalogue published by Christoph Merian Verlag presents a wealth of materials; illustrations, quotes, and excerpts from historic documents appearing side by side with essays by experts in a variety of fields. With contributions by Andreas Beyer, Andrea Bollinger, Bodo Brinkmann, Maike Christadler, Gabriel Dette, Patrick Düblin, Søren Grammel, Anita Haldemann, Josef Helfenstein, Michael Kessler, Andrea Maihofer, Ariane Mensger, Charles Ray, Sabine Söll-Tauchert, Monica Stucky, Hortensia von Roten, Regina Wecker, Maja Wismer, and others.

The photographs of Harold Edgerton


The photographs of Harold Edgerton—a pioneer of flash technology and a largely under-recognized figure in the history of twentieth century American photography—will be on view beginning Friday, March 30 in the Whitney’s third floor Susan and John Hess Family Gallery. The works—a revelatory selection of about forty photographs shot from the 1930s through the 1960s—are drawn entirely from the Whitney’s collection, which includes 122 of Edgerton's works.

Drop of milk against red background. 
The works on view include photographs depicting single and multiple-exposure images of household products, performances, sporting events, and staged scenarios. Some of the photographs were taken in controlled environments like the bullet piercing a playing card, while others were made in public spaces requiring complex lighting and logistical coordination.


Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Untitled (Man and violin)
Date
n.d.
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 4 × 5 1/16 in. (10.2 × 12.9 cm) Image: 3 9/16 × 4 1/2 in. (9 × 11.4 cm)
Edition information
Vintage
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.54

“Throughout his work, Edgerton ingeniously married playfulness to rational inquiry, joy to reason, and experimentation to formal innovation,” said Whitney assistant curator Carrie Springer, the organizer of the exhibition.

Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Dennie Shute
Date
1938
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Image: 14 3/4 × 15 7/8 in. (37.5 × 40.3 cm) Mount (board): 24 × 19 7/8 in. (61 × 50.5 cm)
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.27

In the early 1930s, Harold Edgerton (1903–1990), an engineer and photographer, developed flash technology that allowed him to photograph objects and events moving faster than the eye can perceive. Combining technical insight and an aesthetic sensibility, Edgerton’s photographs gave unprecedented clarity to the physical world and revealed the magic of everyday life.


Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Flight of a Dove
Date
1934
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 23 7/8 × 20 in. (60.6 × 50.8 cm) Image: 21 5/16 × 18 in. (54.1 × 45.7 cm)
Edition information
18/25
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.78

Born in Nebraska, Edgerton learned about photography as a teenager from his uncle. His formal studies were in electrical engineering, and he earned a Doctorate of Science from MIT in 1931. It was in that year that Edgerton began to develop significant innovations for the stroboscope, electronic flash lighting equipment that he used in high-speed photography. 

Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Untitled (Milk Drop 3)
Portfolio/Series
Drop Falling into Cup of Milk
Date
c. 1935
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 14 × 10 15/16 in. (35.6 × 27.8 cm) Image: 10 5/8 × 8 in. (27 × 20.3 cm)
Edition information
Edition of 10
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.62
A member of the MIT faculty from 1927 through 1968, Edgerton also established a business partnership to develop applications for his innovations, and was deeply engaged throughout his career in collaborating with photographers, scientists, and various organizations to develop new methods for photographing a wide range of subjects in motion. 

Deeply involved with the development of sonar and deep-sea photography, his equipment was used by Jacques Cousteau in searching for shipwrecks and the Loch Ness monster. 
Although Edgerton was uncomfortable being called an artist, his work significantly expanded the legacy of such nineteenth-century figures as Eadweard Muybridge and Thomas Eakins, and shared some of the conceptual terrain of early twentieth century movements such as Cubism and Futurism.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Book: Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910-1960

Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910-1960
This book presents an audacious account of the ways in which the arts in the Americas were modernized during the first half of the twentieth century. Rather than viewing modernization as a steady progression from one ‘ism’ to another, Edward J. Sullivan adopts a comparative approach, drawing his examples from North America, the Caribbean, Central and South America. By considering the Americas in this hemispheric sense he is able to tease out many stories of art and focus on the ways in which artists from different regions not only adapted and experimented with visual expression, but also absorbed trans-national as well as international influences. He shows how this rich diversity is most evident in the various forms of abstract art that emerged throughout the Americas and which in turn had an impact on art throughout the world.

 House over the Bridge, c.1909 - Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera - House over the Bridge, Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL), Mexico City, Mexico

 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/The_Fourth_of_July%2C_1916_Childe_Hassam.jpg

Childe Hassam, The Fourth of July, 1916, New York Historical Society

East River from the Shelton Hotel, Georgia O'Keeffe (American, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin 1887–1986 Santa Fe, New Mexico), Oil on canvas

Georgia O'Keeffe, East River from the Shelton Hotel, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Laurence King Publishing Ltd. 
  • Hardback
  • 140 illustrations
  • 336 pages
  • 9½ x 6½ in
  • ISBN 9781786271556
  • Published March 2018

About the Author

Edward J Sullivan is the Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of Art History at New York University. He has written numerous books and essays on 19th- and 20th-century art of the Americas and the Iberian Peninsula.

'Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance'


Thomas Cole, The Clove, Catskills, Oil on canvas, 1827, 25 ¼ x 35 1/8 in.  New Britain Museum of American Art.  Charles F.  Smith Fund, 1945.22.
Thomas Cole, The Clove, Catskills, Oil on canvas, 1827, 25 ¼ x 35 1/8 in. New Britain Museum of American Art. Charles F. Smith Fund, 1945.22.

Picturesque and Sublime will present masterworks on paper by major British artists, including Turner and Constable, together with significant oil-on-canvas paintings by Thomas Cole to demonstrate Cole’s radical achievement of transforming the well-developed British traditions of landscape representations into a new bold formulation, the American Sublime.




Thomas Cole, Button Wood Tree, Ink on paper, 13 1/2″ x 16 7/8″, The Albany Institute of History & Art, Gift of Mrs. Florence Cole Vincent, 1958.28.36.

Catalogue


 

April 17, 2018
192 pages, 9 x 11
120 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300233537
PB-with Flaps


 


The authors here explore the role of prints as agents of artistic transmission and look closely at how Cole’s own creative process was driven by works on paper such as drawings, notebooks, letters, and manuscripts. Also considered is the importance of the parallel works of William Guy Wall, best known for his pioneering Hudson River Portfolio. Beautifully illustrated with works on paper ranging from watercolors to etchings, mezzotints, aquatints, engravings, and lithographs, as well as notable paintings, this book offers important insights into Cole’s formulation of a profound new category in art—the American sublime.
Tim Barringer is Paul Mellon Professor in the History of Art at Yale University. Gillian Forrester is senior curator of historic fine art at the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester. Jennifer Raab is assistant professor in the history of art at Yale University. Sophie Lynford and Nicholas Robbins are doctoral candidates in the history of art at Yale University.

Picasso: The Late Work


Museum Barberini, Potsdam
March 9 to June 16, 2019

The future Jacqueline and Pablo Picasso Museum 
The future Jacqueline and Pablo Picasso Museum 


A stepdaughter of Pablo Picasso plans to open a museum in the Southern French city of Aix-en-Provence by 2021.

Catherine Hutin-Blay, the 70-year-old daughter of Picasso’s second wife, Jacqueline Roque (1927-1986), will display some 2,000 works that she inherited from her mother, in the former convent Collège des Prêcheursin. The property was purchased from the Aix-en-Provence town council for about $14 million.

A number of the Picassos in Hutin-Blay's collection have never been exhibited or published before. The future Jacqueline and Pablo Picasso Museum is expected to draw 450,000 to 500,000 visitors per year to the city of 150,000 residents.

A preview of works from the collection will go on view March 9 to June 16, 2019, at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam. The exhibition Picasso: The Late Work will display Picasso's creations in the final two decades of his life (1953-1973) when he painted more portraits of his wife Jacqueline than any of his other models. The selection will show how Picasso kept being an innovator until the very end of his artistic production.

 Jacqueline with Flowers (1954)

Jacqueline with Flowers (1954)

The Doves (1957)

 

The Doves (1957)

 Bust Of A Woman With A Hat  (1962)

Bust Of A Woman With A Hat (1962)

 Homme assis (autoportrait) 1965

Homme assis (autoportrait) 1965

Related article

Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing


1 February – 6 May 2019 - exhibitions of 12 drawings at the following locations:
  • Ulster Museum, Belfast
  • Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery
  • Bristol Museum and Art Gallery
  • National Museum Cardiff
  • Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow
  • Leeds Art Gallery
  • Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
  • Manchester Art Gallery
  • Millennium Gallery, Sheffield
  • Southampton City Art Gallery
  • Sunderland Museums and Winter Gardens
  • A further location to be announced 
24 May – 13 October 2019 - exhibition of over 200 drawings
The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London

22 November 2019 – 15 March 2020 - exhibition of 80 drawings
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh


In February 2019, to mark the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, 144 of the Renaissance master's greatest drawings in the Royal Collection will go on display in 12 simultaneous exhibitions across the UK.

Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing, a nationwide event, will give the widest-ever UK audience the opportunity to see the work of this extraordinary artist. 12 drawings selected to reflect the full range of Leonardo's interests – painting, sculpture, architecture, music, anatomy, engineering, cartography, geology and botany – will be shown at each venue in Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield, Southampton and Sunderland, with a further venue to be announced.

Following the exhibitions at these  venues, in May 2019 the drawings will be brought together to form part of an exhibition of over 200 sheets at The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, the largest exhibition of Leonardo's work in over 65 years.  A selection of 80 drawings will then travel to The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse in November 2019, the largest group of Leonardo's works ever shown in Scotland.

Leonardo used ink made from oak galls and iron salts, which is transparent in infrared light, allowing his black chalk underdrawing to be seen for the first time.

A deluge

Examination of A Deluge, c.1517–18 (to be shown at the National Museum Cardiff) revealed that beneath the pattern-like arrangement of rain and waves in brown ink, Leonardo drew a swirling knot of energy in black chalk at the heart of the composition.

Recto: Studies of flowing water, with notes. Verso: Studies of flowing water, with notes

Similarly, in Studies of water, c.1517–18 (to be shown at the Millennium Gallery, Sheffield) he built up the image in stages, first creating an underlying structure of water currents in chalk and then adding little rosettes of bubbles on the surface in ink, almost as decoration.

All the drawings by Leonardo in the Royal Collection were bound into a single album by the sculptor Pompeo Leoni in Milan around 1590 and entered the Collection during the reign of Charles II. What appear to be two completely blank sheets of paper from this album will be on public display for the first time at The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace. Examination in ultraviolet light has revealed these sheets to be Studies of hands for the Adoration of the Magi, c.1481 and among Leonardo's most beautiful drawings. Watch a clip from the recent Royal Collection Season on the BBC showing the sketches appearing under ultraviolet light.

Leonardo executed the studies of hands in metalpoint, which involves drawing with a metal stylus on prepared paper.  One of the sheets was examined at the UK's national synchrotron, the Diamond Light Source at Harwell, Oxfordshire, using high-energy X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of chemical elements on the paper.  It was discovered that the drawings had become invisible to the naked eye because of the high copper content in the stylus that Leonardo used – the metallic copper had reacted over time to a become a transparent copper salt.

Recto: A study for an equestrian monument. Verso: Studies of flowing water, a cross-bow, geometry, etc

By contrast, A design for the Sforza monument, c.1485–8 (to be shown at Leeds Art Gallery), which is drawn with a silver stylus, is still fully visible.



Expressions of fury in horses, lions and a man by Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). Photograph: Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

Expressions of fury in horses, lions and a man by Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). Photograph: Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016
Leonardo da Vinci – The superficial anatomy of the shoulder and neck, c.1510-11; Pen and ink with wash, over black chalk | 29.2 x 19.8 cm | Royal Collection
Leonardo da Vinci – The superficial anatomy of the shoulder and neck, c.1510-11; Pen and ink with wash, over black chalk | 29.2 x 19.8 cm | Royal Collection
 
http://rsnr.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/roynotesrec/early/2014/08/14/rsnr.2014.0021/F1.large.jpg

 
Leonardo da Vinci's drawing of hemisected man and woman in coition. (From folio RL 19097v, by permission of Royal Collection Trust; copyright © 2014 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.) (Online version in colour.)


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